Health

FILE - In this May 22, 2019, file photo, an opponent of a measure to toughen the rules for vaccination exemptions gives a thumbs down as the bill's author, state Sen. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, makes his closing statements in Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Gavin Newsom and Pan have agreed to limit the role of public health officials in approving doctors' vaccine decisions. But the health officials will increase their oversight of doctors and schools with high numbers of medical exemptions. Sen. Richard Pan announced the changes Tuesday, June 18 after Newsom said he had doubts about giving state public health officials instead of local doctors the authority to decide which children can skip their shots before attending school. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 18, 2019 - 1:32 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California public health officials would have more oversight of doctors and schools with high numbers of medical exemptions for vaccinations under a legislative compromise announced Tuesday. Gov. Gavin Newsom and the bill's author disclosed the deal aimed at cracking down...
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This photo taken on March, 19, 2018 shows Giuseppina Robucci from Poggio Imperiale, near Foggia, Southern Italy. A 116-year-old Italian woman who was the oldest person in Europe and the second-oldest in the world has died. The news agency ANSA said Giuseppina Robucci died Tuesday in the southern Italian town of Poggio Imperiale, where she was born on March 20, 1903. She lived 116 years and 90 days. Robert Young of the U.S.-based Gerentology Research Group said Robucci was the last European born in 1903. She was just two months younger than the current oldest living person, Kane Tanaka of Japan, born on Jan. 2, 1903. Robbuci is currently No. 17 on the list of people who lived the longest lives. (Franco Cautillo/ANSA via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 10:55 am
MILAN (AP) — A 116-year-old Italian woman who authorities say was the oldest person in Europe and the second oldest in the world has died. The Italian news agency ANSA said Giuseppina Robucci died Tuesday in the southern Italian town of Poggio Imperiale, where she was born on March 20, 1903. She...
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In this photo taken on Thursday, June 13, 2019, piles of trash are seen in the streets of Mostar, Bosnia. Uncollected thrash is piling up on the streets of the southern Bosnian city of Mostar - one of the Balkan nation’s main tourist destinations - since residents begun blocking access to the city’s sole landfill, insisting that it poses serious health and environmental risks. The landfill, located in a residential area, has operated since the 1960s. (Denis Leko/FENA via AP) MOSTAR, 13. juna (FENA) - (Foto FENA/Denis Leko)
June 18, 2019 - 10:47 am
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Uncollected thrash is piling up on the streets of the southern Bosnian city of Mostar — one of the Balkan nation's main tourist destinations — since residents begun blocking access to the city's sole landfill, insisting that it poses serious health and...
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This X-Ray imagery provided by The University of Kansas Health System shows the skull of Eli Gregg with a knife embedded. The 15-year-old Kansas boy is recovering days after doctors removed a 10" knife that impaled his face when he fell while playing. Gregg's harrowing experience began late Thursday, June 13, 2019, when he was playing outside his home in Redfield, about 11 miles from Fort Scott in southeast Kansas. The knife was embedded into his skull, extending to the underside of the brain. The tip of it had indented the carotid artery, the major artery which supplies blood to the brain. Surgeons at The University of Kansas Health System removed it Friday morning. Eli is expected to be able to go home Monday and should recover fully. (The University of Kansas Health System via AP)
June 17, 2019 - 3:12 pm
KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — A 15-year-old Kansas boy got a large knife to the face, and doctors say he's extremely lucky. Jimmy Russell said her son, Eli Gregg, was playing Thursday evening outside of their home in Redfield, about 90 miles (145 kilometers) south of Kansas City, when she heard him...
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Kenya's health minister Sicily Kariuki speaks to the media about measures the government is taking to prevent Ebola, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya Monday, June 17, 2019. Kenyan doctors are testing a hospital patient in western Kenya who has Ebola-like symptoms, as eastern Congo is struggling to control the outbreak and Uganda has reported two deaths from the deadly hemorrhagic fever, though Kenya's health minister downplayed the threat Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Senosi)
June 17, 2019 - 11:22 am
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya remains free from Ebola as test results show that a sick woman does not have the deadly hemorrhagic fever, while neighboring Uganda and Congo battle a stubborn outbreak of the disease. Kenya's Health Minister Sicily Kariuki Monday announced that a patient isolated at the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2017, file photo, worshippers attend Sunday Mass at Blessed Diego de San Vitores Church in Tumon, Guam. No doctors are willing to perform abortions in the U.S. territory of Guam, and the island's first female governor is concerned about the fallout. Gov. Lourdes Leon Guerrero fears women will seek illegal or dangerous alternatives after the last abortion provider retired last year. Abortion is legal in the heavily Catholic Pacific island, but doctors can deny services unless it's a medical emergency.(AP Photo/Tassanee Vejpongsa, File)
June 15, 2019 - 5:50 pm
HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — A Catholic group has protested the governor of Guam's plan to recruit abortion providers to the U.S. territory where no doctors are currently willing to terminate pregnancies. Gov. Lou Leon Guerrero's recruitment idea has drawn criticism and support from residents, the Pacific...
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In this Thursday, June 13, 2019, photo, Lloyd Nackley, a plant ecologist with the Oregon State University Extension Service, holds freshly picked tops of hemp plants from one of Oregon State's hemp research stations in Aurora, Ore. A unit of wheat is a called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn't yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
June 14, 2019 - 7:14 pm
AURORA, Ore. (AP) — A unit of wheat is called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn't yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity. That's one example of the startling...
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Dr. Carlos Reyes-Sacin, left, shows CDC director Robert Redfield inside a telemedicine room at the Medical Advocacy and Outreach clinic in Montgomery, Ala. on Friday, June 14, 2019. (Jake Crandall/Montgomery Advertiser via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 5:07 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As the federal government prepares to launch an ambitious initiative to end the HIV epidemic, the director of the Centers for Disease Control on Friday applauded an Alabama HIV clinic's commitment to providing health services to rural communities. Director Robert Redfield...
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People coming from Congo have their temperature measured to screen for symptoms of Ebola, at the Mpondwe border crossing with Congo, in western Uganda Friday, June 14, 2019. In Uganda, health workers had long prepared in case the Ebola virus got past the screening conducted at border posts with Congo and earlier this week it did, when a family exposed to Ebola while visiting Congo returned home on an unguarded footpath. (AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi)
June 14, 2019 - 2:04 pm
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization on Friday said the Ebola outbreak in Congo — which spilled into Uganda this week — is an "extraordinary event" of deep concern but does not yet merit being declared a global emergency. The U.N. health agency convened its expert committee for the third...
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June 14, 2019 - 1:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court in Washington is backing an order barring the Trump administration from enforcing a policy that had prevented immigrant teens in government custody from getting abortions. The Trump administration's policy dates to 2017. It prohibited shelters from...
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