t

In this aerial image taken from video, emergency crews respond to where a World War II-era bomber B-17 plane crashed at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Conn., Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (WFXT Boston 25 News via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 9:53 pm
WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. (AP) — A pilot with more than 7,000 hours of experience flying a B-17 and his co-pilot were among seven people killed when the bomber crashed and burned at a Connecticut airport, officials said Thursday. Pilot Ernest McCauley, 75, of Long Beach, California, had flown for over...
Read More
This May 5, 2018 image shows cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde National Park near Cortez, Colorado. The White House announced Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, that Finland has agreed to return Native American ancestral remains and funerary objects that where excavated in 1891 from Mesa Verde and ended up in the collection of the National Museum of Finland. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
October 03, 2019 - 5:20 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The ancestral remains of Native American tribes that once called the cliffs of Mesa Verde National Park home will be repatriated as part of an agreement between Finland and the United States. The White House announced the agreement during a news conference in Washington on...
Read More
FILE - This May 16, 2005, file photo shows the home of authors Stephen and Tabitha King in Bangor, Maine. The writers have petitioned the city of Bangor for a zoning change for the home where they raised their children. If approved, the mansion will become home to Stephen King’s archives, and a guest house next door will become home to writers in residence. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
October 03, 2019 - 12:45 pm
Stephen and Tabitha King are ready for the next chapter for their Maine home that stands behind a wrought iron gate festooned with winged creatures and spiderwebs. The authors have petitioned the city of Bangor for a zoning change for the home where they raised their children. If approved, the...
Read More
FILE - In this June 3, 2019 file photo, protesters with Stand.earth hold a banner in opposition to Carnival Corp. outside of federal court, in Miami. Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
October 02, 2019 - 3:35 pm
MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge is pushing top Carnival Corp. executives to work faster to fix ocean pollution problems by the world’s largest cruise line. At a hearing Wednesday in Miami federal court, U.S. District Judge Patricia Seitz said she expects more concrete action and fewer promises from...
Read More